in

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop Faces False Advertising Claims

Getty Images | Layne Murdoch Jr

Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle website Goop hasn’t been keeping providing consumers with the whole truth about some of its products. The company is currently facing criticism from an advertising watchdog group for promoting almost 50 products that have no evidence of actually working.

This isn’t the first time that the company has been under fire for false advertising claims. Earlier this year, the site was under fire when they featured a jade vaginal egg that was meant to treat infertility and prevent uterine prolapse.

A complaint was sent to two California district attorneys this week, and the nonprofit watchdog, Truth In Advertising, says it investigated many of the claims that the website has promoted without reliable evidence. Truth in Advertising is urging lawmakers to force the website to stop using these “deceptive marketing” tactics.

The group said that many of the products that the site promotes claim to “treat, cure prevent, alleviate symptoms of, or reduce the risk of developing a number of ailments, ranging from depression, anxiety, and insomnia, to infertility, uterine prolapse, and arthritis, just to name a few.”

Next-level medicine-chest snooping and product sampling, all in one. Link in bio for our list guest-room beauty essentials.

A post shared by goop (@goop) on

In a statement by executive director Bonnie Patten, she denounced the site’s continued disregard for its consumers for the sake of making a profit. She said:

“Marketing products as having the ability to treat diseases and disorders not only violates established law but is a terribly deceptive marketing ploy that is being used by Goop to exploit women for its own financial gain. Goop needs to stop its misleading profits-over-people marketing immediately.”

Other products that the website promoted include “energy-balancing” body stickers that “rebalance the energy frequency in our bodies.” Only a few days later, a NASA expert debunked the product in a Gizmodo article, causing the site to pull the product.

In response to the complaint, a spokesperson for Goop told E! News:

“While we believe that TINA’s description of our interactions is misleading and their claims unsubstantiated and unfounded, we will continue to evaluate our products and our content and make those improvements that we believe are reasonable and necessary in the interests of our community of users.”

Bella Hadid Style: Bringing 90’s Back

Jennifer Lopez & A-Rod on Set of Shades of Blue