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Juice Cleanse: 3 Myths About Juice Cleanses

Ever since our culture has become obsessed with cleansing, everybody has attempted some form of a juice cleanse in their life — some ending better than others and actually lasting longer than a hot minute. And there’s nothing wrong with drinking juice, although it’s not as healthful as eating fresh fruits and vegetables, which are packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and plenty of fiber, especially in their skins and pulp.

Along with not receiving all the healthy vitamins and minerals that actual fruit have to offer, the juice used in juice cleanses does not come cheap. They require expensive, prepackaged bottles of pulverized produce blends. The two trendy beverages are the green mixture containing kale, spinach, green apple, cucumber, celery and lettuce or a red concoction made with apple, carrot, beets, lemon and ginger.

According to dietitian and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Diabetics Joy Dubost, juice cleanses and liquid detox diets are not a healthy approach to weight loss.

Now that we know what we’ve sort of always known, let’s get to busting some juice cleanse myths:

Myth No. 1: People need to detox in order to be healthy

The body detoxifies itself naturally, primarily through the action of the liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, Dubost said.

Myth No. 2: Cleansing is good for your body — it can improve your energy and health

According to Dubost, people have this false sense of security about being on a juice cleanse and believe they are doing something beneficial, when in fact people who do these cleanses are doing anything but that.

Myth No. 3: A juice cleanse is a good way to lose weight

While an individual may shed a few pounds in the beginning of a cleanse, due to a loss of water, it is ineffective as a long-term solution to weight loss, Dubost said.

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